American hypocrisy!!!

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American hypocrisy!!!

Postby GWB » Mon Aug 11, 2008 5:54 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/10/wo...gewanted=print

News Analysis
In Georgia Clash, a Lesson on U.S. Need for Russia
By HELENE COOPER

WASHINGTON — The image of President Bush smiling and chatting with Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin of Russia from the stands of the Beijing Olympics even as Russian aircraft were shelling Georgia outlines the reality of America’s Russia policy. While America considers Georgia its strongest ally in the bloc of former Soviet countries, Washington needs Russia too much on big issues like Iran to risk it all to defend Georgia.

And State Department officials made it clear on Saturday that there was no chance the United States would intervene militarily.

Mr. Bush did use tough language, demanding that Russia stop bombing. And Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice demanded that Russia “respect Georgia’s territorial integrity.”

What did Mr. Putin do? First, he repudiated President Nicolas Sarkozy of France in Beijing, refusing to budge when Mr. Sarkozy tried to dissuade Russia from its military operation. “It was a very, very tough meeting,” a senior Western official said afterward. “Putin was saying, ‘We are going to make them pay. We are going to make justice.’ ”

Then, Mr. Putin flew from Beijing to a region that borders South Ossetia, arriving after an announcement that Georgia was pulling its troops out of the capital of the breakaway region. He appeared ostensibly to coordinate assistance to refugees who had fled South Ossetia into Russia, but the Russian message was clear: This is our sphere of influence; others stay out.

“What the Russians just did is, for the first time since the fall of the Soviet Union, they have taken a decisive military action and imposed a military reality,” said George Friedman, chief executive of Stratfor, a geopolitical analysis and intelligence company. “They’ve done it unilaterally, and all of the countries that have been looking to the West to intimidate the Russians are now forced into a position to consider what just happened.”

And Bush administration officials acknowledged that the outside world, and the United States in particular, had little leverage over Russian actions.

“There is no possibility of drawing NATO or the international community into this,” said a senior State Department official in a conference call with reporters.

The unfolding conflict in Georgia set off a flurry of diplomacy. Ms. Rice and other officials at the State Department and the Pentagon have been on the telephone with Russia’s foreign minister, Sergey V. Lavrov, and other Russian counterparts, as well as with officials in Georgia, urging both sides to return to peace talks.

The European Union — and Germany, in particular, with its strong ties to Russia — called on both sides to stand down and scheduled meetings to press their concerns. At the United Nations, members of the Security Council met informally to discuss a possible response, but one Security Council diplomat said it remained uncertain whether much could be done.

“Strategically, the Russians have been sending signals that they really wanted to flex their muscles, and they’re upset about Kosovo,” the diplomat said. He was alluding to Russia’s anger at the West for recognizing Kosovo’s independence from Serbia.

Indeed, the decision by the United States and Europe to recognize Kosovo may well have paved the way for Russia’s lightning-fast decision to send troops to back the separatists in South Ossetia. During one meeting on Kosovo in Brussels this year, Mr. Lavrov, the foreign minister, warned Ms. Rice and European diplomats that if they recognized Kosovo, they would be setting a precedent for South Ossetia and other breakaway provinces.

For the Bush administration, the choice now becomes whether backing Georgia — which, more than any other former Soviet republic has allied with the United States — on the South Ossetia issue is worth alienating Russia at a time when getting Russia’s help to rein in Iran’s nuclear ambitions is at the top of the United States’ foreign policy agenda.

One United Nations diplomat joked on Saturday that “if someone went to the Russians and said, ‘OK, Kosovo for Iran,’ we’d have a deal.”

That might be hyperbole, but there is a growing feeling among some officials in the Bush administration that perhaps the United States cannot have it all, and may have to choose its priorities, particularly when it comes to Russia.

The Bush administration’s strong support for Georgia — including the training of Georgia’s military and arms support — came, in part, as a reward for its support of the United States in Iraq. The United States has held Georgia up as a beacon of democracy in the former Soviet Union; it was supposed to be an example to other former Soviet republics of the benefits of tilting to the West.

But that, along with America and Europe’s actions on Kosovo, left Russia feeling threatened, encircled and more convinced that it had to take aggressive measures to restore its power, dignity and influence in a region it considers its strategic back yard, foreign policy experts said.

Russia’s emerging aggressiveness is now also timed with America’s preoccupation with Iraq and Afghanistan, and the looming confrontation with Iran. These counterbalancing considerations mean that Moscow is in the driver’s seat, administration officials acknowledged.

“We’ve placed ourselves in a position that globally we don’t have the wherewithal to do anything,” Mr. Friedman of Stratfor said. “One would think under those circumstances, we’d shut up.”

One senior administration official, when told of that quote, laughed. “Well, maybe we’re learning to shut up now,” he said. He asked that his name not be used because he was not authorized to speak publicly on the issue.

C. J. Chivers contributed reporting.


sound familiar?
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Postby Abou Jamra » Tue Aug 12, 2008 1:19 pm

Very familiar indeed. Just as the US gave the green light to Syria prior to Desert Storm it is appeasing Russia in the case it dares to adventure into Iran.

Just a note: Israel has stopped supplying arms to Georgia in the fear that Russia might increase it arms sales to Iran and Syria.

Wake up March 14
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Postby Abou Jamra » Fri Aug 15, 2008 4:24 pm

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As GMA said nafakhouwon wa tayarouwon. Dont think your as big as your masters.
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Postby jieh2008 » Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:54 pm

“America has no formal colonial empire and seeks none, but like other great powers over the past two centuries, it has sometimes sought to impose peace on the tortured politics of weaker societies. Consequently, it faces many of the same strategic dilemmas as did the great powers that have gone before it.
US policy around the world has been training of military forces in democratic states so that their militaries would operate in a more professional and disciplined fashion.
You said naphakhouwon, so what are you suggesting? Come on, be straight about it. By preparing Georgian soldiers for duty in Iraq or Lebanese forces to face criminals like nahr el-bared , what exactly do you think that American training said or did that was objectionable?.
. As for the US re-equipping the Georgian or the Lebanese army, if that’s wrong, one obvious implication is that it would somehow be better if the Georgian or Lebanon republic were unable to defend themselves against Moscow -Israel - Syria -Palestinian-wahhabis, maybe that’s true, maybe not, but surely you would admit that this is a rather Moscow-favorable interpretation of things, offered by a Moscow bureau chief( c.j.chivers) for the new York times.
As for Helene cooper (born in Monrovia , Liberia and obama supporter) offer us a narrative story that is, let’s be honest, very Moscow-centric, backed by a couple of unnamed US government sources. The last one she cites, the one American “official who covers Georgian affairs,” sounds like possibly he or she has an agenda or two. Is that possible? It would be a lot easier to rely on anonymous sources. A decent reporter will seek facts, truth and names.
The US, which has had a long term policy of assisting places like Georgia and Lebanon with training and equipment, for reasons that long predate Iraq or Afghanistan, also saw this as the quid pro quo.
Georgia and Lebanon military were small, poorly led, ill-equipped and weak.
Georgia offered troops to go to Iraq were matched with a Pentagon effort to overhaul Georgia’s forces from bottom to top, and they did the same for Lebanon (for what price, I don‘t know). Was that a naphkhowoun?.”
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Postby Abou Jamra » Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:48 am

Jieh2008

America has no formal colonial empire and seeks none, but like other great powers over the past two centuries, it has sometimes sought to impose peace on the tortured politics of weaker societies. Consequently, it faces many of the same strategic dilemmas as did the great powers that have gone before it.


I tend to disagree with that statement. The USA never seeks to impose peace. The USA doesn’t want peace and quite. The USA wants quite. And it wants it on its terms. Peace is a bargaining tool and it doesn’t come cheap, nations have to pay a very hefty price to purchase it from the US. This might soon be witnessed in Ukraine and Georgia, who will have no choice but to agree to US demands and place American missles on their territory.

US policy around the world has been training of military forces in democratic states so that their militaries would operate in a more professional and disciplined fashion.


At what expense? under what cover? load of bullshit if you ask me...

You said naphakhouwon, so what are you suggesting? Come on, be straight about it. By preparing Georgian soldiers for duty in Iraq or Lebanese forces to face criminals like nahr el-bared , what exactly do you think that American training said or did that was objectionable?.


I wasn’t referring to military support in my post, but rather political. Earlier in the year the USS Cole was sent to the Med as a show of support for the Saniora Gov. What did it achieve? Were the M14ers not deceived and mislead? Just as Saakashvili promised his people that the US is coming to protect him, GeaGea threated to open bay baya if the roads weren’t open, Jumblat threatened to burn al akhdar wal yebes, Harriri wanted to wipe out the Shia and disarm HA and to change the Syria regime. What has become of all this over confidence and chest beating? Syria is back on the international stage, and Russia contrary to what Bush stated has earned the respect it deserves. That’s what I meant by Nafakouwon.

As for Helene cooper (born in Monrovia , Liberia and obama supporter) offer us a narrative story that is, let’s be honest, very Moscow-centric, backed by a couple of unnamed US government sources. The last one she cites, the one American “official who covers Georgian affairs,” sounds like possibly he or she has an agenda or two. Is that possible? It would be a lot easier to rely on anonymous sources. A decent reporter will seek facts, truth and names.


In international diplomatic affairs I tend to find off record information given by unnamed sources far more credible than those given by named sources.

Georgia and Lebanon military were small, poorly led, ill-equipped and weak.


And now they are big, well led, overly equipped and strong? Are we ready to defend our selves (without the assistance of the resistance) against Israel?


Georgia offered troops to go to Iraq were matched with a Pentagon effort to overhaul Georgia’s forces from bottom to top, and they did the same for Lebanon (for what price, I don‘t know).


Man they gave Lebanon a few hummers, a few jeeps and a couple of other toys. How is that an overhaul of lebanon’s forces? We know all too well the price and what was expected. Akeed nafakouwon M14 thought that Israeli commandos and the US navy were going to invade the Dahieh, kidnap HN, disarm HA and hand the country over to them.

Saakashvili made the same mistake as the M14ers. Just as they thought they could defeat the opposition and impose their will on the people, he though he could take on the might of Russia.

Viva Putin, Viva Chafez, Viva Castro, Viva Aoun, Viva Nassrallah.

Che 7ay feena :lol:
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Postby Abou Jamra » Mon Aug 18, 2008 5:27 am

WASHINGTON: The US President, George Bush, has offered his most effusive support of the embattled Pakistani President, Pervez Musharraf, saying the general "hasn't crossed the line" and "truly is somebody who believes in democracy".


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan's ruling coalition finalized impeachment charges against President Pervez Musharraf on Sunday and a government minister said they could be filed as early as this week if he does not resign first.


Another of Bush's pals is going out the door.

Maybe the US will give him assylum and he can play baseball with Haroun and jieh2008. Hey they can even have a few beers together at Yankee Doodle.
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Postby jieh2008 » Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:20 am

Lebanon and U.S.A share long standing ties, which are enhanced by the fact that a majority of Arab-Americans are Lebanese, by the democratic and pro-western orientation of the Lebanese, as well as the country’s strategic value.
In order to support the Lebanese government, the United States and its international and Arab partners vied with Iran and Hezbollah to win the “hearts and minds” of many Lebanese citizens. Iran channeled millions of dollars in cash assistance through Hezbollah , while the international community raised several billion dollars at emergency donor conferences here and there . Nevertheless, Lebanon remains in need of aid from abroad. From a military standpoint, the war also highlighted the urgent need for a more robust Lebanese military to adequately patrol Lebanon’s borders in land and sea.
The U.S gave $770 million in foreign aid for Lebanon, a country that has received an estimated $35 million to $40 million per year in U.S. assistance in the past.
The LAF remains capable of internal security only; it is too understaffed and
Under-equipped to serve as a deterrent against anyone. The LAF’s active force is 65,000 to 70,000 personnel.
Lebanese forces are lightly armed, poorly organized for maneuver warfare, and lack both a meaningful air force and modern land-based air defense assets.
U.S. military assistance to Lebanon marks the third time in the last 25 years that the United States has sought to expand military cooperation with Lebanese forces. With the end of civil war, the United States again provided military aid, primarily in the form of non-lethal equipment (such as armored personnel carriers and transport helicopters) including 25 5-ton trucks more than 300 Humvees, 200 cargo trucks, helicopter repair parts, assaults rifles, grenade launchers, anti tanks weapons and urban warfare bunker weapons, mobile communications systems and coastal patrol crafts to enhance the LAF’s patrol operations. Expanded personnel training by private U.S. contractors and spare parts and ammunition for Lebanese forces. I don’t know where the naphakhowon and toys here since Aoun was in the military, let us say at least in 1984,5,6,7,8,9.... As for the USS COLE, just remember what was going on in Sharam el-sheikh that time, you will have your real answer, as for the navy, kidnap, invade, Rumors are numerous, and who is going to believe them anyway. And for those vivas, only Aoun deserve one or two, the rest are invited with you, Mousharraf and haroun to a beer (amstel, chang, country wheat or bring or name your favorites) at beach party here, we will have our own Yankee Doodle. And why not invite Aoun too, I like the man. I would invite the rests, but I don’t know the languages, and I don’t know where to find the remains of Che, sorry.
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Postby Abou Jamra » Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:56 pm

This is what you get for selling out. Regardless it wont change anything other than increase tension and further division between Russia and Georgia.

By JENNIFER LOVEN, Associated Press Writer


Bush announces $1 billion in aid for Georgia



WASHINGTON - Pushing back against an increasingly aggressive Moscow, President Bush said Wednesday the U.S. will send an extra $1 billion to Georgia to help the pro-Western former Soviet republic in the wake of Russia's invasion.

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"Georgia has a strong economic foundation and leaders with an impressive record of reform," Bush said in a statement. "Our additional economic assistance will help the people of Georgia recover from the assault on their country, and continue to build a prosperous and competitive economy."

Vice President Dick Cheney, due in Georgia on Thursday, planned to make the massive aid package a major highlight of his discussions with Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili. Cheney is on a tour of three former Soviet republics that are wary of Russia's intentions in what Moscow likes to call its "near abroad" sphere of influence and what Cheney termed while in Azerbaijan on Wednesday "the shadow of the Russian invasion of Georgia."

"The free world cannot allow the destiny of a small independent country to be determined by the aggression of a larger neighbor," Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice told reporters at the State Department in a simultaneous announcement with Bush.

She mocked Russia for its recognition of the two separatist regions in Georgia that are at the heart of the conflict that broke out last month, and for its failure to garner international backing.

"Almost no one followed suit, I might note. It isn't really an impressive list to have Abkhazia and South Ossetia recognize each other," she said.

Also in tandem with Bush, the International Monetary Fund announced it has agreed to lend Georgia $750 million for economic recovery.

The administration is delaying an announcement on some sort of punishment of Russia for its actions against Georgia and its refusal thus far to comply with a French-brokered cease-fire. However, the decision to shower tiny Georgia with such substantial aid and have Cheney talk about it in Moscow's backyard will likely be seen by the Kremlin as highly provocative, if not a punitive measure in and of itself.

The dollar total is half the $2 billion a year the U.S. gives Israel, its largest aid recipient. But the sizable amount still shows the strategic importance the U.S. places on both supporting Saakashvili's Western-leaning government and countering the desire by a newly resurgent and energy-rich Moscow for greater regional influence.

Cheney made a point in Azerbaijan of saying that Washington has "a deep and abiding interest" in the region's stability.

That said, the U.S. has found during this conflict that it has little leverage with Russia. Moscow has drawn condemnations from the United States and Europe, but little else. Meanwhile on Wednesday, Russia closed its embassy in Georgia, following Georgia's severing of diplomatic ties with Moscow.

After years of tensions, the recent fighting began Aug. 7 when Georgian forces went into its breakaway province of South Ossetia in hopes of re-establishing control. Russian forces repelled the offensive and pushed deep into Georgia proper.

Both sides signed the cease-fire in mid-August, but Russia has ignored its requirement for all forces to return to prewar positions.

Bush said the money will meet humanitarian needs, such as helping to resettle families that were displaced. The U.S. already has provided $30 million in humanitarian relief since the conflict began.

The United States has sent two military ships bearing aid to Georgia, and the USS Mount Whitney — the flagship of the Navy's 6th Fleet — steamed through the Dardanelles early Wednesday and was expected to pass through the Bosporus later in the day. The two Turkish-controlled straits link the Mediterranean to the Black Sea.

The new funds are also aimed at helping impoverished Georgia, wedged between Russia and Turkey on the Black Sea, to rebuild infrastructure and boost an economy that has been growing but is nowhere near grown.

Georgia wants to rebuild and modernize its badly routed military. Though U.S. officials emphasized that none of the current package was for military aid, there was no effort to rule that out for the future. Russia has accused the United States of delivering arms on the U.S. warships that have docked in Georgian ports with humanitarian supplies.

Rice said that $570 million of the funds will be made available in the remaining months of the Bush administration, though Congress will have to approve $200 million of that. That also leaves a sizable portion — $430 million — up to the budgeting discretion of next year's Congress and the new president.

But Bush feels confident in that area, as both the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates, Barack Obama and John McCain, have expressed strong support for Georgia's embattled government and Bush's approach to Russia's invasion.

On trade, Bush said the United States would negotiate a deal to provide preferential access to Georgian exports. The president said his commerce secretary would dispatch a trade mission to Georgia in the coming weeks
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